22Jul, 2014

What Patients Are Asking About ACL Surgery

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This blog is dedicated to answering many of the questions we’ve received regarding Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) reconstruction. These are Dr. Sanders’ recommendations for those contemplating this procedure. Recommendations 1. Aggressive presurgical rehabilitation emphasizing normal gait without braces or crutches, normal leg control, full range of motion, especially hyperextension equal to the opposite leg. 2. Surveillance for ubiquitous Vitamin D deficiency and of nasal staph infection. Presurgical treatment for these conditions to hasten bone healing and avoidance of wound infection. Surveillance for other lower extremity disorders is performed which will […]
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9Jul, 2014

Vitamin D and Longevity

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Increasing Science Suggests Vitamin D Deficiency is Linked not only to Poor Bone Health, but also a Growing Number of Life Threatening Diseases Vitamin D has historically been linked to bone health – deficiencies implicated in the diagnosis of rickets and osteomalacia in children and frail adults. And while cases of rickets have diminished over the years, the important role that Vitamin D continues to play in not only musculoskeletal but also overall health has captured the medical community’s attention. In fact, Vitamin D deficiency, which has reached an epidemic […]
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28May, 2014

Podiatrist vs Orthopaedic Surgeon?

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We are often asked what is the difference between a podiatrist and an Orthopedic surgeon and when is it a wiser choice to see an Orthopedic surgeon. So we thought we would dedicate this month’s blog to addressing this very important question. The biggest differences: An Orthopaedic surgeon is a Doctor of Medicine, who graduates from Medical School. A podiatrist does not graduate from Medical School but rather podiatry school and is not a Doctor of Medicine. An Orthopaedic surgeon has a global understanding of a patient’s musculoskeletal health and […]
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13Feb, 2014

Assessing Foot & Ankle Health – Simple Steps to Avoid Serious Problems

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Foot and ankle health is key to maintaining overall health and well being – ensuring proper load bearing activity necessary in maintaining the integrity of the musculoskeletal system as well as quality of life. The foot and ankle can be important indicators of health – providing early warning signs of potentially devastating problems. Identifying these early signs will allow the correction of such conditions before they result in more serious limb…and life threatening problems. THE DIABETIC FOOT The prevalence of foot ulcers and their limb threatening impact on the lower […]
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10Jan, 2014

Rotational Deformity, Part 2

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Treating Rotational Deformity, Restoring Normal Leg Function This is Part 2 of a previous blog on Rotational Deformity. This condition is frequently misdiagnosed and can cause pain for years before a physician trained to identify the signs is able to correct the problem. To the untrained eye, the subtle signs of Rotational Deformity may go undetected. Childhood photo of patient showing visible malrotation. Treating rotational deformity generally entails the use of several different osteotomy procedures. Osteotomy means bone cutting and entails a transverse bone cut just above or below a […]
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16Jul, 2013

Rotational Deformity, Part 1

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Rotational Deformity, Part 1 This month’s blog focuses on rotational deformities and is one of a two part series on the condition. Fifty years ago, Dr. Hughston, one of the founding fathers of American Sports Medicine, imparted a vernacular term for rotational deformities of the lower extremity – “Miserable Malalignment.” A rotational deformity in adults can often be difficult to diagnose. Before finding an orthopedic specialist who can identify this condition, some patients may, unfortunately, undergo years of ineffective treatments and physical limitations. Rotational deformities can frequently occur in childhood, […]
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21Aug, 2008

ACL Tear: How To Know If You Have A Torn ACL & What You Should Do

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A tear of the anterior cruciate ligament can be suspected if most of these features are present: Patients with a torn ACL generally recall the moment that the ACL gave out. Although the injury may be a contact or a non-contact injury, it usually involves a twisting of the femur bone and tibia bone in relation to one another. As the ACL snaps apart during the injury, very often the patient hears a loud “pop” which may even be heard by others nearby. If it is the ACL that is […]
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21Aug, 2008

Competitive Youth Sports Injuries Today Can Lead to Permanent Damage Tomorrow, If Proper Precautions Aren’t Taken

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by Dr. Mark Sanders As youth sports intensify, American children get bigger and seasons last longer and longer, youth sports injuries have become more common and more severe. In years past it was not out of the ordinary to see a sprained ankle or perhaps a broken leg associated with a youth sport-related injury. But today Orthopedic surgeons like myself are seeing an increase in adult-type athletic injuries such as a torn anterior cruciate ligaments (ACL), tendonitis, torn cartilage, and torn rotator cuffs. Football is recognized as one of the […]
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7Aug, 2008

Choosing the Right ACL Graft For The Right Person

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When deciding about which type of graft to use for an ACL reconstruction, consider this: A recent study, presented at the 2008 American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine’s annual meeting, has shown that almost 25% of allograft (grafts from a cadaver) reconstructions fail* in patients 40 years and younger. Furthermore, according to many esteemed Orthopaedic surgeons, at least 50% of those patients whose ACL allografts fail, and who want to maintain an active lifestyle, will first need a bone graft operation to fill in the tunnels and then a second […]
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31Jul, 2008

Sports Injuries: How to Avoid Orthopedic Surgery

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Anyone who has ever been involved in athletics knows that minor sports injuries are just par for the course. Muscle strains, sore limbs and pulled ligaments are not anything to be overly concerned about; a few days of rest and you can usually avoid any lasting damage. But sometimes damage such as rotator cuff tears or ACL injuries can require more than just some relaxation time, and serious athletes may sometimes end up visiting a clinic for some type of orthopedic surgery. How can active, energetic individuals enjoy their activities […]
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